Painful Trigger Point Treatment - Does it have to hurt?

Painful Trigger Point Treatment – Does it really have to hurt?

trigger point

Painful trigger point treatment is not the only kind of treatment. In most cases, it doesn’t have to hurt. It took me a long time to come round to this way of thinking, as I explain in the video below.  But often the most effective trigger point releases aren’t in fact at all painful. It’s just a question of working with your body rather than against it.

Remember – painful trigger point treatment can be avoided, you just need to know how to do it.

To learn more about pain-free trigger point releases, check out the Trigger Point Course.

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(15) comments

sankar July 21, 2010

i really happy to say about trigger point treatment. it is very usefull.

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    Jonathan August 14, 2010

    hello Sankar

    I am delighted that you have found treating your trigger points helpful. It has very wide applications.

    kind regards
    Jonathan

    Reply
che August 14, 2010

hi, thanks for the letters you sent, this is che btw from the philippines. im a physical therapist and works with a lot of patients with lbp, mps and thus ive been reading your emails..

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Linda August 28, 2010

I’m glad I found this on the net and explored it. Now to actually do it. I doubt there is anyone practicing this treatment here in zimbabwe. Thanks for Sharing so freely.
linda

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Ian Jarvis December 4, 2010

I agree that the soft approach, working WITH the body is the best way. I think that one problem is that many TP books have argued that you should hold to a sensitivity level of 7 or 8 out of 10. Practitioners, students and readers have taken this to heart.
I met Tarpan Williams in 1994 from whom I learnt the Spineworks principles and techniques. He taught that a level 5 or 6 was quite sufficient – above that the client’s subconscious tissue reaction will be to defend. These days I tend to work at 4 or 5 MAX and often at no sensitivity or just 1 or 2. This is also what I teach on Spineworks courses. I think that Thomas Griner probably works in a similar way – I have read his book (now out of print) and he does not describe the detail of his technique.
These days, more people that I meet are adopting the softer approach though there are still plenty of practitioners who (with their clients) think that pain is gain! I certainly find it works far better than the “painfull one” and anyway I don’t like hurting my clients!
So more strength to the elbows of the gentle practitioner!

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Cath S December 6, 2010

Hello there,
I live here in NZ and have subscribed to your emails re TrP.
I also have the book by Clair Davis called the Trigger Point workbook.
deactivation of trigger points have saved my life!

I wish this one thing was known world wide. myofascial release is quite simply fantastic!

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Ian Jarvis December 10, 2010

Good news Cathy.
The Clair Davis book is an excellent book for helping to find places where TPs might be lurking and a good description of the actions of muscles. He died a little while ago and his daughter, Amber, is continuing the work in USA.
My main disagreement is the amount of pressure he advocates. In Chap 3 he says that TP work “… may not be pleasant at first” while also warning the reader not to do too much. Then in his table 3.1 (next page) he instructs you to use a “pain level of 7″ (out of 10). I think that Greg Forrs in his (otherwise excellent) recent book* also recommends that level. This is too much for me, as I wrote in my last post, since your body will be reacting to an invader.
I would be interested in what sort of sensitivity level you found worked for you.
Incidentally, Clair and Amber have issued a TP book that focusses on the frozen shoulder which has more detail about that specific set of joints.
(*”Why We Hurt” – where he uses the term Neuromuscular Lesion or NML instead of Trigger Point. I quite like that as it is slightly more descriptive.)

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hany April 21, 2011

iam pt from egypt i would ask about the ideal use for tens and ultrasound as acomplementatry ttt for trigger points

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SANDRA June 5, 2011

WELL MY REALLY PROBLEM IS MY NECK AND SHOULDERS,WHEN I USE MY ANDS AND ARMS IS OK FOR THAT MOMENT,BUT WHEN I STOP USE IT, IN TEN MINUTES MY PEN INCREASE A LOT I CAN MOVE, I GET CRAISE WITH THE PAIN.
MY PROBLEM IS FIBROMIALGYA.
I HAVE THIS PROBLEM FOR TWELVE YEARS AND I REALY WHANT TO LEAVE WITHOUT THIS PAIN.
I HAVE TRY PHYSYOTHERAPY FOR 6 YEARS ,AND HELP JUST FOR THE DAY ONLY AND THE NEXT DAY IAM VERY SORE I CAN MOVE .
ALSO I DID TRY CHAROPRACTOR FOR THREE YEARS AND THIS HELP MI A LOT BUT I DON HAVE MONEY TO CONTINUE WITH THIS TREATMENT, AT THE TIME I STOP THIS TREATMENT SLOWLY I STARTED TO GETTING BADLY AGAIN.

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sharon July 2, 2011

thankyou for the free trigger manual johnathan its helped a lot i would like to know more about the course but thankyou for videos you have sent me very good they was it also helps me and i treat my family and all the free information you have given me is a very big help thankyou so much by shaz

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ashraf December 17, 2011

sir jonathan Kuttner you are the best …

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hussein4714 January 9, 2012

thank you very much sir .indeed it is a good practice .it helps me to soothe many of my patients

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Ian Jarvis January 10, 2012

Sorry for not writing sooner but have been working in Bhopal with victims of the gas leak.
@hany and @Sandra – You mention TENS & ultraspund, Hany, so I want to say that there is much better tecnology now available and it will also help you Sandra with your fibromyalgeia.
Modern TENS* type devices are referred to as Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Field (PEMF) devices. There are many available from clinical ones such as Myopulse/Acupulse, Cosmodic, Tennant Biomodulator, and home use ones such as Micro Doctor, Painsolv and E-cell. The main difference being the range, flexibility and price. These can be used in a variety of ways depending on the precise problem. With fibromyalgeia you will need general treatments to raise your total body voltage which will take several months but would work out cheaper than many therapy or chiropractic sessions.
On TPs I have found the most efffective additional ‘tool’ to be Reiki as I hold the point. It will also help fibromyalgeia.
I am happy to converse more specifically if Jonathon does not mind me putting my website name here – spineworks.eu (I am the other side of the world so no competition, just spreading good knowledge)
*(TENS is a general term standing for Transcutaneous Elctro-Neurologic Stimultion, so arguably it covers any devices that put an electrical current across the skin, which is all of them)
Ian

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dr.ashwini September 6, 2012

Its painful , but a relief thoroughly nd not that much need to convince the patient and divert the mind

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